Deportations from the province of Minusinsk

Deportations from the province of Minusinsk

Mass deportations of farmers from this province also started in February-March 1930, after having taken place sporadically in 1929 when an escorted transport of exiles from the southern districts was taken to Tayshet and from there to the nearby Shitkinsk district.

Early in 1930 farmers were deported to Cheremkhovo, to the Angara River (partly to the small settlement of Kodinsk in the Kezhma district), as well as to the mica mine in Barginsk and to the Biryussa River (partly to Pakateyevo). In the summer of 1930 they began to organize deportations to the Chulym River to the burned-out Chulsk woodlands, as well as to Tsentro-gar beyond Teguldet, and yet further to the east, to the Pyshkino-Troytskoye (today Pyervomayskoe) district. At that time, the first exile streams were directed to Ol'khovka (Artyomovsk) to the gold mines in the mountains. Moreover, some exiles from these provinces happened to get to the Kungus River in 1930 to the settlements of Ambarchik and Samsonovka (Irbey district).

In 1931 the main exile streams from the province of Minusinsk flooded to the Chulym River and further to the west up to Yaya station and even to Artyomovsk. From the Chulym River many exiles were soon transferred further to the south, to the mines of the Tisulsk district (today Kemerovo region): Tsentralny, Makarak, Berikul. All persons interested (???) were taken to that place (but, of course, only those who were able to work).

After the shutdown of the Baginsk mica mine in the middle of the 1930s, some exiles were transferred from there to Kandaki (on the Tasseyeva River, not far from Mashukovka), then to the upper course of the Biryussa also to a mica mine, and from there, in the 1940s, to Aldan in Yakutia. This is how far the odyssey from the province of Minusinsk could lead.

As a result of such transfers from one place to the other, some of the exiles got to the Bolshoye Murta district to Rossiyka and Predevinsk (see section 4.1).

 


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