Deportations from the Volga Region and the Central Black Earth Region

Deportations from the Volga Region and the Central Black Earth Region

The deportation streams from these regions, which ended up in our region, started in 1930 and went on continuously until 1933. However, a considerable number of them did not get there directly.

The ethnic structure, as far as the streams from the Central Black Earth Region are concerned, mainly comprised Ukrainians (from the southern provinces, particularly from the province of Rossoshansk) and Russians, whereas the majority of the exile streams from the Volga Region were Russians, Tartars, Mordvines (Erzya and, possibly, Moksha).

In the spring of the year 1930 one of the guarded transports with farmers from East Mordovia was ordered into internal exile. The train was unloaded in Sretensk, Transbaikalia, from which the deportees were taken down the Shilka River to the north, to a mine called Tselik in the Ust'-Kariysk district (today district of Chernyshevsk, Chita region). They were kept there until the spring of 1932, then taken back to Sretensk, loaded on a train and transported to Krasnoyarsk.

In the autumn of 1930 they deported a guarded transport with farmers from the TASSR (Tatarstan). The train was also directed to Transbaikalia. However, the exiles were taken to a butane mine. In the spring of the year 1932 they, too, were withdrawn from the mine, loaded on a train and transported to Krasnoyarsk.

Early in 1931 they deported a guarded train transport with farmers from the province of Rossoshansk in the Central Black Earth Region; they unloaded the train in Irkutsk and jailed the exiles in the half-destroyed central prison (see section 4.2 ff.). They were kept there for two months, then once again loaded on a train and sent to Transbaikalia, as well. The train was unloaded at Mogocha station and all exiles were taken to the north to the settlement of Tupik on the banks of the Tungir River (center of the Tungiro-Olyokminsk district). Women with children and old people remained in Tupik, but the men were forced further to the north (about 150 km) to the Kalar mine in the mountains (today Kalar district in the Chita region). In the spring of 1932 (different reports talk of 1931) the men were relocated from Kalar to Tupik. Afterwards they took all exiles to Nogocha station, forced them on a train and transported them to Krasnoyarsk.

A small number of these deportees remained in the woodworking factories in Krasnoyarsk. The rest was removed to Yenisseysk, where another small number of them remained in the woodworking factory. The majority, however, was taken away to the mines in the North-Yenisseysk and Udereysk districts (today Motygino district).

Some of the deported families from the western part of the province of Rossoshansk happened to reach the exile region of Yartsevo. However, we do not have any exact information about which "march route" this stream took - either "straight" by way of Krasnoyarsk or by going the roundabout way through the Transbaikalian mines.

The last deportation stream started in the spring of the year 1933. In April they deported a guarded transport with exiles from Lenza. The deportees were unloaded in Achinsk, taken down the Chulym River to the north on barges and disembarked north of the Birilyussy district in a settlement called Sopka. Another transport left from the eastern districts of Mordovia in May of 1933. This train was unloaded in Tomsk. The exiles were taken down the Ob' River to the north on barges, and then up the Chulym. They were disembarked in the burned-out woodlands on the banks of the Chindat, not far from Chulym (in the Birilyussy district, today Tyuchtet district). Thus, on this burned-out spot arose the settlement of Passechnoye (downstream from Sopka).

Table of main places of internal exile of deportees from the Volga Region and the Central Black Earth Region.


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